How to Figure Out the Right Price Point

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Kate Nezhura (Director of Product at MobilityWare - Gaming Studio) shares with Steve P. Young (CEO at App Masters - App Marketing Agency) how to figure out the preferred price point for IAPs, why segmentation is important and best practices for LiveOps.

Source:
How to Figure Out the Right Price Point
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(direct link to watch/listen)
Type:
Podcast
Publication date:
May 18, 2021
Added to the Vault on:
May 27, 2021
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💎 #
1

Identify what your segments of users are the most comfortable with as far as their preferred price points, because it’s really hard to move players to a higher preferred price point. Kate has worked across several apps, in different organizations and in general if a player plays $3 the first time he will keep paying $3 at a time.

02:30
💎 #
2

To move players to the next price point, try ecommerce strategies where you do price point anchoring while still displaying their favorite price point: highlighting how good of a deal a higher price point is might work. Example: $3 as preferred price point but $5 purchase is a much better deal.

03:05
💎 #
3

It’s much easier to increase the frequency of purchases than moving players from one preferred price point to the other.

03:26
💎 #
4

For ad frequency, it’s ok to start by finding the best performing average. But go further and segment users so you can implement an ad frequency that is optimized for each segment.

04:30
💎 #
5

For new users, start at a high price point but already adding a bonus or a discount. If players don’t purchase, keep the value constant but reduce the price over time (e.g. $5 -> $3 -> $1). If they still don’t purchase, start increasing the value with a bigger discount or bonus.

06:05
💎 #
6

It costs money to bring players in, and when you have a freemium model with no ads then anything you can get out of players is good. Value can come from virality (e.g. players share something), but sometimes even getting a small amount with a big discount is better than nothing.

09:06
💎 #
7

It’s very powerful to not let your players play for too long: if you have mechanics that limit how long they can play, it makes players come back.

16:28
💎 #
8

When forming monetization hypotheses to test for, consider what competition is doing but also what features are being added in adjacent genres and categories. MobilityWare has found a lot of success that way. Example: social casino with women > 40yo playing collections, clubs, leagues, etc. (a lot coming from Asian games). Features can be simplified for your game if that audience is a good fit.

20:40
💎 #
9

It’s important to have a threshold you want to reach for your target KPI when testing the first version of a feature/MVP, especially if you know iterations will be needed. A feature might not move the needle on monetization right away, but if engagement improves significantly it shows there is potential because players care about it. Example: comparing two features with one increasing engagement 2% and the other 40%.

23:05
💎 #
10

Companies that monetize through ads don’t really tap into adding monetization hooks into their LiveOps, and sometimes skip LiveOps altogether. But you can always incorporate monetization across the flow with things like “double your rewards by watching an ad”.

29:40
💎 #
11

To come up with good LiveOps, think about the user segment you’re trying to optimize for. Are you going after the average players? Or your most engaged/valuable players?

33:12
💎 #
12

Approach your roadmap with an open mind, and willing to actually change your mind. Example: initially pushing for a feature internally or to management but deciding not to do it anymore after thinking more about it and looking at more data.

38:49
The gems from this resource are only available to premium members.
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  • Receive the hottest gems 🔥 (most valuable insights) each month
Upgrade Your Plan
💎 #
1

Identify what your segments of users are the most comfortable with as far as their preferred price points, because it’s really hard to move players to a higher preferred price point. Kate has worked across several apps, in different organizations and in general if a player plays $3 the first time he will keep paying $3 at a time.

02:30
💎 #
2

To move players to the next price point, try ecommerce strategies where you do price point anchoring while still displaying their favorite price point: highlighting how good of a deal a higher price point is might work. Example: $3 as preferred price point but $5 purchase is a much better deal.

03:05
💎 #
3

It’s much easier to increase the frequency of purchases than moving players from one preferred price point to the other.

03:26
💎 #
4

For ad frequency, it’s ok to start by finding the best performing average. But go further and segment users so you can implement an ad frequency that is optimized for each segment.

04:30
💎 #
5

For new users, start at a high price point but already adding a bonus or a discount. If players don’t purchase, keep the value constant but reduce the price over time (e.g. $5 -> $3 -> $1). If they still don’t purchase, start increasing the value with a bigger discount or bonus.

06:05
💎 #
6

It costs money to bring players in, and when you have a freemium model with no ads then anything you can get out of players is good. Value can come from virality (e.g. players share something), but sometimes even getting a small amount with a big discount is better than nothing.

09:06
💎 #
7

It’s very powerful to not let your players play for too long: if you have mechanics that limit how long they can play, it makes players come back.

16:28
💎 #
8

When forming monetization hypotheses to test for, consider what competition is doing but also what features are being added in adjacent genres and categories. MobilityWare has found a lot of success that way. Example: social casino with women > 40yo playing collections, clubs, leagues, etc. (a lot coming from Asian games). Features can be simplified for your game if that audience is a good fit.

20:40
💎 #
9

It’s important to have a threshold you want to reach for your target KPI when testing the first version of a feature/MVP, especially if you know iterations will be needed. A feature might not move the needle on monetization right away, but if engagement improves significantly it shows there is potential because players care about it. Example: comparing two features with one increasing engagement 2% and the other 40%.

23:05
💎 #
10

Companies that monetize through ads don’t really tap into adding monetization hooks into their LiveOps, and sometimes skip LiveOps altogether. But you can always incorporate monetization across the flow with things like “double your rewards by watching an ad”.

29:40
💎 #
11

To come up with good LiveOps, think about the user segment you’re trying to optimize for. Are you going after the average players? Or your most engaged/valuable players?

33:12
💎 #
12

Approach your roadmap with an open mind, and willing to actually change your mind. Example: initially pushing for a feature internally or to management but deciding not to do it anymore after thinking more about it and looking at more data.

38:49
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💎 #
1

Identify what your segments of users are the most comfortable with as far as their preferred price points, because it’s really hard to move players to a higher preferred price point. Kate has worked across several apps, in different organizations and in general if a player plays $3 the first time he will keep paying $3 at a time.

02:30
💎 #
2

To move players to the next price point, try ecommerce strategies where you do price point anchoring while still displaying their favorite price point: highlighting how good of a deal a higher price point is might work. Example: $3 as preferred price point but $5 purchase is a much better deal.

03:05
💎 #
3

It’s much easier to increase the frequency of purchases than moving players from one preferred price point to the other.

03:26
💎 #
4

For ad frequency, it’s ok to start by finding the best performing average. But go further and segment users so you can implement an ad frequency that is optimized for each segment.

04:30
💎 #
5

For new users, start at a high price point but already adding a bonus or a discount. If players don’t purchase, keep the value constant but reduce the price over time (e.g. $5 -> $3 -> $1). If they still don’t purchase, start increasing the value with a bigger discount or bonus.

06:05
💎 #
6

It costs money to bring players in, and when you have a freemium model with no ads then anything you can get out of players is good. Value can come from virality (e.g. players share something), but sometimes even getting a small amount with a big discount is better than nothing.

09:06
💎 #
7

It’s very powerful to not let your players play for too long: if you have mechanics that limit how long they can play, it makes players come back.

16:28
💎 #
8

When forming monetization hypotheses to test for, consider what competition is doing but also what features are being added in adjacent genres and categories. MobilityWare has found a lot of success that way. Example: social casino with women > 40yo playing collections, clubs, leagues, etc. (a lot coming from Asian games). Features can be simplified for your game if that audience is a good fit.

20:40
💎 #
9

It’s important to have a threshold you want to reach for your target KPI when testing the first version of a feature/MVP, especially if you know iterations will be needed. A feature might not move the needle on monetization right away, but if engagement improves significantly it shows there is potential because players care about it. Example: comparing two features with one increasing engagement 2% and the other 40%.

23:05
💎 #
10

Companies that monetize through ads don’t really tap into adding monetization hooks into their LiveOps, and sometimes skip LiveOps altogether. But you can always incorporate monetization across the flow with things like “double your rewards by watching an ad”.

29:40
💎 #
11

To come up with good LiveOps, think about the user segment you’re trying to optimize for. Are you going after the average players? Or your most engaged/valuable players?

33:12
💎 #
12

Approach your roadmap with an open mind, and willing to actually change your mind. Example: initially pushing for a feature internally or to management but deciding not to do it anymore after thinking more about it and looking at more data.

38:49
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Monetization strategies

[💎@02:30] Identify what your segments of users are the most comfortable with as far as their preferred price points, because it’s really hard to move players to a higher preferred price point. Kate has worked across several apps, in different organizations and in general if a player plays $3 the first time he will keep paying $3 at a time.

[💎@03:05] To move players to the next price point, try ecommerce strategies where you do price point anchoring while still displaying their favorite price point: highlighting how good of a deal a higher price point is might work. Example: $3 as preferred price point but $5 purchase is a much better deal.

[💎@03:26] It’s much easier to increase the frequency of purchases than moving players from one preferred price point to the other.

In the social casino space, people would buy $9 packs, but frequently, which can lead to a very high LTV.

When it comes to frequency for ads, people sometimes focus on the best performing average. Example: A/B/C/D test where you realize that on average displaying ads at Level 3 works better than at other levels.

But ideally you can segment users to have an approach displaying what works best for this specific segment.

[💎@04:30] For ad frequency, it’s ok to start by finding the best performing average. But go further and segment users so you can implement an ad frequency that is optimized for each segment.

[💎@06:05] For new users, start at a high price point but already adding a bonus or a discount. If players don’t purchase, keep the value constant but reduce the price over time (e.g. $5 -> $3 -> $1). If they still don’t purchase, start increasing the value with a bigger discount or bonus.

Mobilityware has explored separate economies for different players. It hasn’t worked as well as they’ve hoped so far however. It’s not fair to do that for a PvP game, but for a single player game it could work.

Steve question: worth discounting and offering bonuses for players that purchase only once?

[💎@09:06] It costs money to bring players in, and when you have a freemium model with no ads then anything you can get out of players is good. Value can come from virality (e.g. players share something), but sometimes even getting a small amount with a big discount is better than nothing.

Tools

At Product Madness, they had a system built in-house with criterias/rules that display offers for users.

When to prompt IAPs

When to prompt IAPs really depends on the game. 

Some games, most of the LTV from a player comes within the first few days after the install. But sometimes it might be too soon to ask.

Gaming is a freemium model so you convert only a small percentage. It can be frustrating for users and hurt retention.

Choosing when to start showing IAPs can be based on the session the player is in, or the levels he’s reached. Example: it’s your first session but you’re out of currency, show the player a good offer.


MobilityWare has also experimented just giving a lot of free stuff to players within the first few sessions to keep them playing and that has been successful too.

You should test, each time with a strong hypothesis.

Strategies that help retention + monetization. 

Steve mentioned an energy bar that you can refill each day by watching video ads.

Examples from MobilityWare:

- Jigsaw Puzzle: 1 free puzzle a day, but you need to pay to play more

- Casino space: tiny daily gift to play a little bit, but you need to pay to play more

Interesting that a lot of match 3 games now offer unlimited lives in their LiveOps. In these cases, it means that monetization has to come from something else than lives, like boosters or reaching level completion, etc.

[💎@16:28] It’s very powerful to not let your players play for too long: if you have mechanics that limit how long they can play, it makes players come back. (Kate used to think that’s why games had limited lives)

The challenge with Jigsaw puzzle games is that the industry standard is to not interrupt the gameplay, yet solving a puzzle can take 1 hour. So they have to think about reinforcing IAPs, about content surfacing, about merchandising. They are still going through those hypotheses.

Testing principles

Start with the KPIs: it’s really important to identify what you’re trying to improve.

Then consider player feedback: surveys, reviews, customer support. You can also play the game yourself.

[💎@20:40] When forming monetization hypotheses to test for, consider what competition is doing but also what features are being added in adjacent genres and categories. MobilityWare has found a lot of success that way. Example: social casino with women > 40yo playing collections, clubs, leagues, etc. (a lot coming from Asian games). Features can be simplified for your game if that audience is a good fit.

No matter what you’re testing, try to get a signal to see if you’re in the right direction: build fast and fail fast. But sometimes if you simplify too much when testing something (“MVP”) and you don’t see results when testing the concept you might not get a second chance.

[💎@23:05] It’s important to have a threshold you want to reach for your target KPI when testing the first version of a feature/MVP, especially if you know iterations will be needed. A feature might not move the needle on monetization right away, but if engagement improves significantly it shows there is potential because players care about it. Example: comparing two features with one increasing engagement 2% and the other 40%.

What’s a good improvement?

You can find benchmarks per genre, but what it comes down to is individual game KPIs: how much does it cost to acquire new users and how much value you’re getting from them. That’s what helps you determine if your KPIs are good or not.

App marketing channels outperforming?

Again, it depends on the app and the platform (iOS or Android).

Geos also play a big role. You want to identify the geos that are cheaper but still worth it. You might also need partners/networks that have access to specific geos, and you might need to figure out different monetization strategies for them.

LiveOps

[💎@29:40] Companies that monetize through ads don’t really tap into adding monetization hooks into their LiveOps, and sometimes skip LiveOps altogether. But you can always incorporate monetization across the flow with things like “double your rewards by watching an ad” .

Think about what feels natural for players (i.e. not extortion) when coming up with ideas.

Most of the LiveOps MobilityWare is doing (e.g. for Jigsaw Puzzle) are focused on the “completionist” aspect: clearing levels or completing challenges bring you additional rewards. Example: week-long event where if you play 9-10 puzzles where when you complete a puzzle you get an item, and you need 5 items to complete an event.

[💎@33:12] To come up with good LiveOps, think about the user segment you’re trying to optimize for. Are you going after the average players? Or your most engaged/valuable players?

You can do week-long challenges, 30-day challenges. 

Using urgency/scarcity

Hasn’t seen a lot of success with this, it might have been overplayed and users think it might be misleading.

Optimizations are powerful, because you can get good improvements without much effort. Big shifts/bets are more risky.

[💎@38:49] Approach your roadmap with an open mind, and willing to actually change your mind. Example: initially pushing for a feature internally or to management but deciding not to do it anymore after thinking more about it and looking at more data.

End questions

  • Favorite games use merge mechanics: Merge Mansion and TravelTown
  • Different teams require different kinds of leadership. You need to understand that first so you can adapt your style. It’s always a work in progress.

The notes from this resource are only available to premium members.
↘ At this point, you know what to do ↙
Upgrade Your Plan

Monetization strategies

[💎@02:30] Identify what your segments of users are the most comfortable with as far as their preferred price points, because it’s really hard to move players to a higher preferred price point. Kate has worked across several apps, in different organizations and in general if a player plays $3 the first time he will keep paying $3 at a time.

[💎@03:05] To move players to the next price point, try ecommerce strategies where you do price point anchoring while still displaying their favorite price point: highlighting how good of a deal a higher price point is might work. Example: $3 as preferred price point but $5 purchase is a much better deal.

[💎@03:26] It’s much easier to increase the frequency of purchases than moving players from one preferred price point to the other.

In the social casino space, people would buy $9 packs, but frequently, which can lead to a very high LTV.

When it comes to frequency for ads, people sometimes focus on the best performing average. Example: A/B/C/D test where you realize that on average displaying ads at Level 3 works better than at other levels.

But ideally you can segment users to have an approach displaying what works best for this specific segment.

[💎@04:30] For ad frequency, it’s ok to start by finding the best performing average. But go further and segment users so you can implement an ad frequency that is optimized for each segment.

[💎@06:05] For new users, start at a high price point but already adding a bonus or a discount. If players don’t purchase, keep the value constant but reduce the price over time (e.g. $5 -> $3 -> $1). If they still don’t purchase, start increasing the value with a bigger discount or bonus.

Mobilityware has explored separate economies for different players. It hasn’t worked as well as they’ve hoped so far however. It’s not fair to do that for a PvP game, but for a single player game it could work.

Steve question: worth discounting and offering bonuses for players that purchase only once?

[💎@09:06] It costs money to bring players in, and when you have a freemium model with no ads then anything you can get out of players is good. Value can come from virality (e.g. players share something), but sometimes even getting a small amount with a big discount is better than nothing.

Tools

At Product Madness, they had a system built in-house with criterias/rules that display offers for users.

When to prompt IAPs

When to prompt IAPs really depends on the game. 

Some games, most of the LTV from a player comes within the first few days after the install. But sometimes it might be too soon to ask.

Gaming is a freemium model so you convert only a small percentage. It can be frustrating for users and hurt retention.

Choosing when to start showing IAPs can be based on the session the player is in, or the levels he’s reached. Example: it’s your first session but you’re out of currency, show the player a good offer.


MobilityWare has also experimented just giving a lot of free stuff to players within the first few sessions to keep them playing and that has been successful too.

You should test, each time with a strong hypothesis.

Strategies that help retention + monetization. 

Steve mentioned an energy bar that you can refill each day by watching video ads.

Examples from MobilityWare:

- Jigsaw Puzzle: 1 free puzzle a day, but you need to pay to play more

- Casino space: tiny daily gift to play a little bit, but you need to pay to play more

Interesting that a lot of match 3 games now offer unlimited lives in their LiveOps. In these cases, it means that monetization has to come from something else than lives, like boosters or reaching level completion, etc.

[💎@16:28] It’s very powerful to not let your players play for too long: if you have mechanics that limit how long they can play, it makes players come back. (Kate used to think that’s why games had limited lives)

The challenge with Jigsaw puzzle games is that the industry standard is to not interrupt the gameplay, yet solving a puzzle can take 1 hour. So they have to think about reinforcing IAPs, about content surfacing, about merchandising. They are still going through those hypotheses.

Testing principles

Start with the KPIs: it’s really important to identify what you’re trying to improve.

Then consider player feedback: surveys, reviews, customer support. You can also play the game yourself.

[💎@20:40] When forming monetization hypotheses to test for, consider what competition is doing but also what features are being added in adjacent genres and categories. MobilityWare has found a lot of success that way. Example: social casino with women > 40yo playing collections, clubs, leagues, etc. (a lot coming from Asian games). Features can be simplified for your game if that audience is a good fit.

No matter what you’re testing, try to get a signal to see if you’re in the right direction: build fast and fail fast. But sometimes if you simplify too much when testing something (“MVP”) and you don’t see results when testing the concept you might not get a second chance.

[💎@23:05] It’s important to have a threshold you want to reach for your target KPI when testing the first version of a feature/MVP, especially if you know iterations will be needed. A feature might not move the needle on monetization right away, but if engagement improves significantly it shows there is potential because players care about it. Example: comparing two features with one increasing engagement 2% and the other 40%.

What’s a good improvement?

You can find benchmarks per genre, but what it comes down to is individual game KPIs: how much does it cost to acquire new users and how much value you’re getting from them. That’s what helps you determine if your KPIs are good or not.

App marketing channels outperforming?

Again, it depends on the app and the platform (iOS or Android).

Geos also play a big role. You want to identify the geos that are cheaper but still worth it. You might also need partners/networks that have access to specific geos, and you might need to figure out different monetization strategies for them.

LiveOps

[💎@29:40] Companies that monetize through ads don’t really tap into adding monetization hooks into their LiveOps, and sometimes skip LiveOps altogether. But you can always incorporate monetization across the flow with things like “double your rewards by watching an ad” .

Think about what feels natural for players (i.e. not extortion) when coming up with ideas.

Most of the LiveOps MobilityWare is doing (e.g. for Jigsaw Puzzle) are focused on the “completionist” aspect: clearing levels or completing challenges bring you additional rewards. Example: week-long event where if you play 9-10 puzzles where when you complete a puzzle you get an item, and you need 5 items to complete an event.

[💎@33:12] To come up with good LiveOps, think about the user segment you’re trying to optimize for. Are you going after the average players? Or your most engaged/valuable players?

You can do week-long challenges, 30-day challenges. 

Using urgency/scarcity

Hasn’t seen a lot of success with this, it might have been overplayed and users think it might be misleading.

Optimizations are powerful, because you can get good improvements without much effort. Big shifts/bets are more risky.

[💎@38:49] Approach your roadmap with an open mind, and willing to actually change your mind. Example: initially pushing for a feature internally or to management but deciding not to do it anymore after thinking more about it and looking at more data.

End questions

  • Favorite games use merge mechanics: Merge Mansion and TravelTown
  • Different teams require different kinds of leadership. You need to understand that first so you can adapt your style. It’s always a work in progress.

The notes from this resource are only available to premium members.

The detailed notes taken for a resource are an easy way to see the gems in context to get a better understanding. They also include any relevant visuals from the source.
↘ At this point, you know what to do ↙
GET Access

Monetization strategies

[💎@02:30] Identify what your segments of users are the most comfortable with as far as their preferred price points, because it’s really hard to move players to a higher preferred price point. Kate has worked across several apps, in different organizations and in general if a player plays $3 the first time he will keep paying $3 at a time.

[💎@03:05] To move players to the next price point, try ecommerce strategies where you do price point anchoring while still displaying their favorite price point: highlighting how good of a deal a higher price point is might work. Example: $3 as preferred price point but $5 purchase is a much better deal.

[💎@03:26] It’s much easier to increase the frequency of purchases than moving players from one preferred price point to the other.

In the social casino space, people would buy $9 packs, but frequently, which can lead to a very high LTV.

When it comes to frequency for ads, people sometimes focus on the best performing average. Example: A/B/C/D test where you realize that on average displaying ads at Level 3 works better than at other levels.

But ideally you can segment users to have an approach displaying what works best for this specific segment.

[💎@04:30] For ad frequency, it’s ok to start by finding the best performing average. But go further and segment users so you can implement an ad frequency that is optimized for each segment.

[💎@06:05] For new users, start at a high price point but already adding a bonus or a discount. If players don’t purchase, keep the value constant but reduce the price over time (e.g. $5 -> $3 -> $1). If they still don’t purchase, start increasing the value with a bigger discount or bonus.

Mobilityware has explored separate economies for different players. It hasn’t worked as well as they’ve hoped so far however. It’s not fair to do that for a PvP game, but for a single player game it could work.

Steve question: worth discounting and offering bonuses for players that purchase only once?

[💎@09:06] It costs money to bring players in, and when you have a freemium model with no ads then anything you can get out of players is good. Value can come from virality (e.g. players share something), but sometimes even getting a small amount with a big discount is better than nothing.

Tools

At Product Madness, they had a system built in-house with criterias/rules that display offers for users.

When to prompt IAPs

When to prompt IAPs really depends on the game. 

Some games, most of the LTV from a player comes within the first few days after the install. But sometimes it might be too soon to ask.

Gaming is a freemium model so you convert only a small percentage. It can be frustrating for users and hurt retention.

Choosing when to start showing IAPs can be based on the session the player is in, or the levels he’s reached. Example: it’s your first session but you’re out of currency, show the player a good offer.


MobilityWare has also experimented just giving a lot of free stuff to players within the first few sessions to keep them playing and that has been successful too.

You should test, each time with a strong hypothesis.

Strategies that help retention + monetization. 

Steve mentioned an energy bar that you can refill each day by watching video ads.

Examples from MobilityWare:

- Jigsaw Puzzle: 1 free puzzle a day, but you need to pay to play more

- Casino space: tiny daily gift to play a little bit, but you need to pay to play more

Interesting that a lot of match 3 games now offer unlimited lives in their LiveOps. In these cases, it means that monetization has to come from something else than lives, like boosters or reaching level completion, etc.

[💎@16:28] It’s very powerful to not let your players play for too long: if you have mechanics that limit how long they can play, it makes players come back. (Kate used to think that’s why games had limited lives)

The challenge with Jigsaw puzzle games is that the industry standard is to not interrupt the gameplay, yet solving a puzzle can take 1 hour. So they have to think about reinforcing IAPs, about content surfacing, about merchandising. They are still going through those hypotheses.

Testing principles

Start with the KPIs: it’s really important to identify what you’re trying to improve.

Then consider player feedback: surveys, reviews, customer support. You can also play the game yourself.

[💎@20:40] When forming monetization hypotheses to test for, consider what competition is doing but also what features are being added in adjacent genres and categories. MobilityWare has found a lot of success that way. Example: social casino with women > 40yo playing collections, clubs, leagues, etc. (a lot coming from Asian games). Features can be simplified for your game if that audience is a good fit.

No matter what you’re testing, try to get a signal to see if you’re in the right direction: build fast and fail fast. But sometimes if you simplify too much when testing something (“MVP”) and you don’t see results when testing the concept you might not get a second chance.

[💎@23:05] It’s important to have a threshold you want to reach for your target KPI when testing the first version of a feature/MVP, especially if you know iterations will be needed. A feature might not move the needle on monetization right away, but if engagement improves significantly it shows there is potential because players care about it. Example: comparing two features with one increasing engagement 2% and the other 40%.

What’s a good improvement?

You can find benchmarks per genre, but what it comes down to is individual game KPIs: how much does it cost to acquire new users and how much value you’re getting from them. That’s what helps you determine if your KPIs are good or not.

App marketing channels outperforming?

Again, it depends on the app and the platform (iOS or Android).

Geos also play a big role. You want to identify the geos that are cheaper but still worth it. You might also need partners/networks that have access to specific geos, and you might need to figure out different monetization strategies for them.

LiveOps

[💎@29:40] Companies that monetize through ads don’t really tap into adding monetization hooks into their LiveOps, and sometimes skip LiveOps altogether. But you can always incorporate monetization across the flow with things like “double your rewards by watching an ad” .

Think about what feels natural for players (i.e. not extortion) when coming up with ideas.

Most of the LiveOps MobilityWare is doing (e.g. for Jigsaw Puzzle) are focused on the “completionist” aspect: clearing levels or completing challenges bring you additional rewards. Example: week-long event where if you play 9-10 puzzles where when you complete a puzzle you get an item, and you need 5 items to complete an event.

[💎@33:12] To come up with good LiveOps, think about the user segment you’re trying to optimize for. Are you going after the average players? Or your most engaged/valuable players?

You can do week-long challenges, 30-day challenges. 

Using urgency/scarcity

Hasn’t seen a lot of success with this, it might have been overplayed and users think it might be misleading.

Optimizations are powerful, because you can get good improvements without much effort. Big shifts/bets are more risky.

[💎@38:49] Approach your roadmap with an open mind, and willing to actually change your mind. Example: initially pushing for a feature internally or to management but deciding not to do it anymore after thinking more about it and looking at more data.

End questions

  • Favorite games use merge mechanics: Merge Mansion and TravelTown
  • Different teams require different kinds of leadership. You need to understand that first so you can adapt your style. It’s always a work in progress.