Mastering the Subscription Lifecycle Marketing & Retention through CRM

💎  x
13

Karan Tibdewal (Mobile Growth Consultant at Phiture) shares the experiences & the frameworks/templates that he has gathered working with some leading subscription brands like Hellofresh, Headspace, Soundcloud & others for mastering the subscription lifecycle marketing & retention through CRM.

Type:
Presentation
Publication date:
December 10, 2020
Added to Growth Gems on:
February 7, 2021
💎 #
1

The traditional "linear" AIDA flow (Awareness → Interest → Desire → Action) is no longer valid. A more realistic journey takes into account the fact that users can go through several different stages, in different order: lapsed users, infrequent users or power users.

09:28
💎 #
2

Fostering a stable relationship irrespective of the customer stage or journey is the key.

14:26
💎 #
3

Karan suggests a way to think across all lifecycle stages, which requires both the right marketing automation tools and data points.

16:24
💎 #
4

Know your customers and what kind of information/assistance they need. Irrespective of the lifecycle stage a user is at, make sure you have both clear expectations and clear data points that show:
- How often the user intends to use the app
- How the user wants to use the app

17:00
💎 #
5

Feedback and reviews is critical, and should not be limited to when the user has lapsed. Users that start interacting with an app have a high motivation and some strong ideas about what's working and what's not, which can be very valuable (and allow you to keep your power users).

18:46
💎 #
6

Hitting "impulse" users with a paywall (including free trial) might work very well for you, but you might also want to design a slower approach for all the users that drop off (so you can hit them with the paywall later, after they've experienced the core value of the app).

21:10
💎 #
7

Try to find daily habits to which you can attach your app in order to increase daily usage. Example: music when working out, music when cooking, etc.

22:10
💎 #
8

Associate the sounds to feelings and leverage it. Example: Duolingo uses the same sound for their notifications as the sound you get when answering correctly in order to trigger a positive reaction. 

23:50
💎 #
9

Asking users for their commitment goal (e.g. usage per day) can be leveraged to then get the most ambitious users back in the app more aggressively through communications. Example: reminders, challenges, leaderboards.

26:30
💎 #
10

Use the information that you've collected (e.g. during onboarding) to frame how you ask for permissions. 

28:50
💎 #
11

Reward users coming back to the app by offering something special if they re-engage with the app.

33:00
💎 #
12

Use in-app messages to push users to experience the app (e.g. do a workout) and giving them a rewarding message before pushing them to the "impulse funnel".

33:35
💎 #
3

Deferred deep linking when you don't know who is going to click on that link and if they have the app installed or not will be less effective. You will need to rely on a probabilistic approach to get people to the right part of the app after the install or "match" with the initial link, which might be problematic in some use cases.

09:33
This is premium content. Upgrade your plan in your profile to get access.
💎 #
1

The traditional "linear" AIDA flow (Awareness → Interest → Desire → Action) is no longer valid. A more realistic journey takes into account the fact that users can go through several different stages, in different order: lapsed users, infrequent users or power users.

09:28
💎 #
2

Fostering a stable relationship irrespective of the customer stage or journey is the key.

14:26
💎 #
3

Karan suggests a way to think across all lifecycle stages, which requires both the right marketing automation tools and data points.

16:24
💎 #
4

Know your customers and what kind of information/assistance they need. Irrespective of the lifecycle stage a user is at, make sure you have both clear expectations and clear data points that show:
- How often the user intends to use the app
- How the user wants to use the app

17:00
💎 #
5

Feedback and reviews is critical, and should not be limited to when the user has lapsed. Users that start interacting with an app have a high motivation and some strong ideas about what's working and what's not, which can be very valuable (and allow you to keep your power users).

18:46
💎 #
6

Hitting "impulse" users with a paywall (including free trial) might work very well for you, but you might also want to design a slower approach for all the users that drop off (so you can hit them with the paywall later, after they've experienced the core value of the app).

21:10
💎 #
7

Try to find daily habits to which you can attach your app in order to increase daily usage. Example: music when working out, music when cooking, etc.

22:10
💎 #
8

Associate the sounds to feelings and leverage it. Example: Duolingo uses the same sound for their notifications as the sound you get when answering correctly in order to trigger a positive reaction. 

23:50
💎 #
9

Asking users for their commitment goal (e.g. usage per day) can be leveraged to then get the most ambitious users back in the app more aggressively through communications. Example: reminders, challenges, leaderboards.

26:30
💎 #
10

Use the information that you've collected (e.g. during onboarding) to frame how you ask for permissions. 

28:50
💎 #
11

Reward users coming back to the app by offering something special if they re-engage with the app.

33:00
💎 #
12

Use in-app messages to push users to experience the app (e.g. do a workout) and giving them a rewarding message before pushing them to the "impulse funnel".

33:35
💎 #
3

Deferred deep linking when you don't know who is going to click on that link and if they have the app installed or not will be less effective. You will need to rely on a probabilistic approach to get people to the right part of the app after the install or "match" with the initial link, which might be problematic in some use cases.

09:33
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💎 #
1

The traditional "linear" AIDA flow (Awareness → Interest → Desire → Action) is no longer valid. A more realistic journey takes into account the fact that users can go through several different stages, in different order: lapsed users, infrequent users or power users.

09:28
💎 #
2

Fostering a stable relationship irrespective of the customer stage or journey is the key.

14:26
💎 #
3

Karan suggests a way to think across all lifecycle stages, which requires both the right marketing automation tools and data points.

16:24
💎 #
4

Know your customers and what kind of information/assistance they need. Irrespective of the lifecycle stage a user is at, make sure you have both clear expectations and clear data points that show:
- How often the user intends to use the app
- How the user wants to use the app

17:00
💎 #
5

Feedback and reviews is critical, and should not be limited to when the user has lapsed. Users that start interacting with an app have a high motivation and some strong ideas about what's working and what's not, which can be very valuable (and allow you to keep your power users).

18:46
💎 #
6

Hitting "impulse" users with a paywall (including free trial) might work very well for you, but you might also want to design a slower approach for all the users that drop off (so you can hit them with the paywall later, after they've experienced the core value of the app).

21:10
💎 #
7

Try to find daily habits to which you can attach your app in order to increase daily usage. Example: music when working out, music when cooking, etc.

22:10
💎 #
8

Associate the sounds to feelings and leverage it. Example: Duolingo uses the same sound for their notifications as the sound you get when answering correctly in order to trigger a positive reaction. 

23:50
💎 #
9

Asking users for their commitment goal (e.g. usage per day) can be leveraged to then get the most ambitious users back in the app more aggressively through communications. Example: reminders, challenges, leaderboards.

26:30
💎 #
10

Use the information that you've collected (e.g. during onboarding) to frame how you ask for permissions. 

28:50
💎 #
11

Reward users coming back to the app by offering something special if they re-engage with the app.

33:00
💎 #
12

Use in-app messages to push users to experience the app (e.g. do a workout) and giving them a rewarding message before pushing them to the "impulse funnel".

33:35
💎 #
3

Deferred deep linking when you don't know who is going to click on that link and if they have the app installed or not will be less effective. You will need to rely on a probabilistic approach to get people to the right part of the app after the install or "match" with the initial link, which might be problematic in some use cases.

09:33
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This content is available to Growth Gems premium members only.
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[💎 @09:28] The traditional "linear" AIDA flow (Awareness → Interest → Desire → Action) is no longer valid. A more realistic journey takes into account the fact that users can go through several different stages: lapsed users, infrequent users or power users. Example.

[💎 @14:26] Fostering a stable relationship irrespective of the customer stage or journey is the key.

[💎 @16:24] Karan suggests a way to think across all lifecycle stages, which requires both the right marketing automation tools and data points: see here.

[💎 @17:00] Know your customers and what kind of information/assistance they need. Irrespective of the lifecycle stage a user is at, make sure you have both clear expectations and clear data points that show:

  • How often the user intends to use the app
  • How the user wants to use the app

Focus on defining and identifying core and power users so you can both "upgrade" core users to power users and keep your power users.

[💎 @18:46] Feedback and reviews is critical, and should not be limited to when the user has lapsed. Users that start interacting with an app have a high motivation and some strong ideas about what's working and what's not, which can be very valuable (and allow you to keep your power users).

Not all customers want to hear from you on all channels. Be careful not to lose customers because of too many communications or promotions.

[💎 @21:10] Hitting "impulse" users with a paywall (including free trial) might work very well for you, but you might also want to design a slower approach for all the users that drop off (so you can hit them with the paywall later, after they've experienced the core value of the app).

You should think about the behavioral triggers that get customers to think about and use your app. Example: Soundcloud sending Berlin-specific music when a user enters Berlin.

[💎 @22:10] Try to find daily habits to which you can attach your app in order to increase daily usage. Example: music when working out, music when cooking, etc.

[💎 @23:50] Associate the sounds to feelings and leverage it. Example: Duolingo uses the same sound for their notifications as the sound you get when answering correctly in order to trigger a positive reaction.

[💎 @26:30] Asking users for their goal (e.g. usage per day) can be leveraged to then get the most ambitious users back in the app more aggressively through communications. Example: reminders, challenges, leaderboards.

Some users know exactly what they want to do. But others might need help or guidance. An in-app test like below can help you with this.

[💎 @28:50] Use the information that you've collected (e.g. during onboarding) to frame how you ask for permissions. Example here.

Instead of upselling for a "no-ad" purchase after X number of days, leverage the information of how much time a user has wasted on ads to be more convincing. Example: "you've spent X minutes watching ads, upgrade now to say goodbye to ads and be more efficient"

For physical products, you could introduce gamification and rewards through offering an upgrade after X number of products.

[💎 @33:00] Reward users coming back to the app by offering something special if they re-engage with the app.

[💎 @33:35] Use in-app messages to push users to experience the app (e.g. do a workout) and giving them a rewarding message before pushing them to the "impulse funnel".

Q&A

Process when getting started?

  • Ask yourself: do you have the right things in place? Are you tracking the right events and segmenting your users?
  • Audit current lifecycle campaign and brainstorm key event figures. Define a score for different events, etc.

If getting the quantitative data is not possible then you can rely on qualitative data but it's best to put the tools in place.

Tips for gathering feedback with users? At Phiture they use their own tool called Blender, with Braze.

Will user behavior catch up to some of these tactics?

  • Maybe, but if you're being contextual and relevant it is a long term play.

You need a good CRM automation tool (unified CRM tool for all channels) and an analytics tool like Amplitude or Mixpanel.

This is premium content. Upgrade your plan in your profile to get access.

[💎 @09:28] The traditional "linear" AIDA flow (Awareness → Interest → Desire → Action) is no longer valid. A more realistic journey takes into account the fact that users can go through several different stages: lapsed users, infrequent users or power users. Example.

[💎 @14:26] Fostering a stable relationship irrespective of the customer stage or journey is the key.

[💎 @16:24] Karan suggests a way to think across all lifecycle stages, which requires both the right marketing automation tools and data points: see here.

[💎 @17:00] Know your customers and what kind of information/assistance they need. Irrespective of the lifecycle stage a user is at, make sure you have both clear expectations and clear data points that show:

  • How often the user intends to use the app
  • How the user wants to use the app

Focus on defining and identifying core and power users so you can both "upgrade" core users to power users and keep your power users.

[💎 @18:46] Feedback and reviews is critical, and should not be limited to when the user has lapsed. Users that start interacting with an app have a high motivation and some strong ideas about what's working and what's not, which can be very valuable (and allow you to keep your power users).

Not all customers want to hear from you on all channels. Be careful not to lose customers because of too many communications or promotions.

[💎 @21:10] Hitting "impulse" users with a paywall (including free trial) might work very well for you, but you might also want to design a slower approach for all the users that drop off (so you can hit them with the paywall later, after they've experienced the core value of the app).

You should think about the behavioral triggers that get customers to think about and use your app. Example: Soundcloud sending Berlin-specific music when a user enters Berlin.

[💎 @22:10] Try to find daily habits to which you can attach your app in order to increase daily usage. Example: music when working out, music when cooking, etc.

[💎 @23:50] Associate the sounds to feelings and leverage it. Example: Duolingo uses the same sound for their notifications as the sound you get when answering correctly in order to trigger a positive reaction.

[💎 @26:30] Asking users for their goal (e.g. usage per day) can be leveraged to then get the most ambitious users back in the app more aggressively through communications. Example: reminders, challenges, leaderboards.

Some users know exactly what they want to do. But others might need help or guidance. An in-app test like below can help you with this.

[💎 @28:50] Use the information that you've collected (e.g. during onboarding) to frame how you ask for permissions. Example here.

Instead of upselling for a "no-ad" purchase after X number of days, leverage the information of how much time a user has wasted on ads to be more convincing. Example: "you've spent X minutes watching ads, upgrade now to say goodbye to ads and be more efficient"

For physical products, you could introduce gamification and rewards through offering an upgrade after X number of products.

[💎 @33:00] Reward users coming back to the app by offering something special if they re-engage with the app.

[💎 @33:35] Use in-app messages to push users to experience the app (e.g. do a workout) and giving them a rewarding message before pushing them to the "impulse funnel".

Q&A

Process when getting started?

  • Ask yourself: do you have the right things in place? Are you tracking the right events and segmenting your users?
  • Audit current lifecycle campaign and brainstorm key event figures. Define a score for different events, etc.

If getting the quantitative data is not possible then you can rely on qualitative data but it's best to put the tools in place.

Tips for gathering feedback with users? At Phiture they use their own tool called Blender, with Braze.

Will user behavior catch up to some of these tactics?

  • Maybe, but if you're being contextual and relevant it is a long term play.

You need a good CRM automation tool (unified CRM tool for all channels) and an analytics tool like Amplitude or Mixpanel.

This content is available to Growth Gems premium members only.
Apply Now

[💎 @09:28] The traditional "linear" AIDA flow (Awareness → Interest → Desire → Action) is no longer valid. A more realistic journey takes into account the fact that users can go through several different stages: lapsed users, infrequent users or power users. Example.

[💎 @14:26] Fostering a stable relationship irrespective of the customer stage or journey is the key.

[💎 @16:24] Karan suggests a way to think across all lifecycle stages, which requires both the right marketing automation tools and data points: see here.

[💎 @17:00] Know your customers and what kind of information/assistance they need. Irrespective of the lifecycle stage a user is at, make sure you have both clear expectations and clear data points that show:

  • How often the user intends to use the app
  • How the user wants to use the app

Focus on defining and identifying core and power users so you can both "upgrade" core users to power users and keep your power users.

[💎 @18:46] Feedback and reviews is critical, and should not be limited to when the user has lapsed. Users that start interacting with an app have a high motivation and some strong ideas about what's working and what's not, which can be very valuable (and allow you to keep your power users).

Not all customers want to hear from you on all channels. Be careful not to lose customers because of too many communications or promotions.

[💎 @21:10] Hitting "impulse" users with a paywall (including free trial) might work very well for you, but you might also want to design a slower approach for all the users that drop off (so you can hit them with the paywall later, after they've experienced the core value of the app).

You should think about the behavioral triggers that get customers to think about and use your app. Example: Soundcloud sending Berlin-specific music when a user enters Berlin.

[💎 @22:10] Try to find daily habits to which you can attach your app in order to increase daily usage. Example: music when working out, music when cooking, etc.

[💎 @23:50] Associate the sounds to feelings and leverage it. Example: Duolingo uses the same sound for their notifications as the sound you get when answering correctly in order to trigger a positive reaction.

[💎 @26:30] Asking users for their goal (e.g. usage per day) can be leveraged to then get the most ambitious users back in the app more aggressively through communications. Example: reminders, challenges, leaderboards.

Some users know exactly what they want to do. But others might need help or guidance. An in-app test like below can help you with this.

[💎 @28:50] Use the information that you've collected (e.g. during onboarding) to frame how you ask for permissions. Example here.

Instead of upselling for a "no-ad" purchase after X number of days, leverage the information of how much time a user has wasted on ads to be more convincing. Example: "you've spent X minutes watching ads, upgrade now to say goodbye to ads and be more efficient"

For physical products, you could introduce gamification and rewards through offering an upgrade after X number of products.

[💎 @33:00] Reward users coming back to the app by offering something special if they re-engage with the app.

[💎 @33:35] Use in-app messages to push users to experience the app (e.g. do a workout) and giving them a rewarding message before pushing them to the "impulse funnel".

Q&A

Process when getting started?

  • Ask yourself: do you have the right things in place? Are you tracking the right events and segmenting your users?
  • Audit current lifecycle campaign and brainstorm key event figures. Define a score for different events, etc.

If getting the quantitative data is not possible then you can rely on qualitative data but it's best to put the tools in place.

Tips for gathering feedback with users? At Phiture they use their own tool called Blender, with Braze.

Will user behavior catch up to some of these tactics?

  • Maybe, but if you're being contextual and relevant it is a long term play.

You need a good CRM automation tool (unified CRM tool for all channels) and an analytics tool like Amplitude or Mixpanel.