The Dichotomy on Mobile Games Market

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14

Session 3 of the “Secrets of Game Growth” event by Mopub. Michail Katkoff (CEO of Savage Game Studios, Founder of Deconstructor of Fun) moderates a panel on game development, marketability and monetization with Sophie Vo (Studio Lead at Voodoo, Founder at Rise and Play), Matthew Lewis (GM of Call of Duty mobile) and Vincent Pagnard-Jourdan (Head of Publisher Partnerships at EMEA, MoPub)

Source:
The Dichotomy on Mobile Games Market
(no direct link to watch/listen)
(direct link to watch/listen)
Type:
Panel
Publication date:
May 31, 2021
Added to the Vault on:
June 19, 2021
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💎 #
1

For hypercasual games, it all starts with a mindset of “we don’t know what we don’t know”. The best way of knowing is to get to market fast and test a lot of ideas. They have small, lean teams with ownership at the team level.

02:31
💎 #
2

For any games they do at Voodoo, they start by assessing the marketability first. They need to know very quickly that the game is viable on that front and that’s why they test a lot.

03:53
💎 #
3

Hypercasual is also about developing what the market demands at a big scale which means it is very based on trends: what was popular a few years ago may not be popular today. That’s why you have to test a lot.

04:19
💎 #
4

For a game like Call of Duty Mobile it is not just about having the right LTV/CPI ratio, it’s also about having the content pipeline that allows the game to maintain at a high level for a long time and evolve. Example: some content related to the “seasons” fatigued faster than they thought it would, so they had to tweak it.

06:27
💎 #
5

While Call of Duty mobile is primarily IAP, they are trying to build a massive community and they know that a lot of people are not going to pay. So there has to be a way for players to get cool gear without paying: players can grind their way through playing or through watching ads.

12:44
💎 #
6

However they do think about potential cannibalization of IAPs through ads/gameplay, so there are some cosmetics that you can only get through monetization. Example: a new common weapon (and its power) can be obtained through playing or watching ads (to keep things fair), but the best cosmetics often require paying.

13:32
💎 #
7

There is a trend in the “midcore casual”: “casual” games that become more and more complex. Example: Project Makeover which is like 3 games in one and covering different player needs in one game (decoration, fashion, match 3).

15:17
💎 #
8

There is also a trend of “hybrid casual” games that fall between casual and hypercasual (ad-based yet with a good amount of IAPs). These games offer more interest over time than hypercasual games, yet look very approachable (easy to get started on). Trend is also visible in China with games developed by Ohayoo.

16:04
💎 #
9

With ATT it’s important to think about games that have a broader appeal, where you don’t suffer from the lack of granularity.

17:02
💎 #
10

Post-ATT, the most important is how good you are at product marketing (not UA). UA is important (data science, creative capabilities) but there are ways you can drive installs and maintain community outside of UA. However the challenge for indies is that this tends to be very resource-intensive and it’s hard to achieve without increasing headcount.

19:16
💎 #
11

With ATT rolling out, there is an appetite for gaming developers to diversify their ads revenue and capture brand budget. In 2020, brand advertisers also understood that their audience is in gaming. We’re at the beginning of more brands advertising within games.

22:14
💎 #
12

To make it as a smaller studio, it’s less about the game idea that you have than it is about finding the right talent and building the right culture.

24:10
💎 #
13

When testing for marketability (hypercasual and casual games), test first on your actual target market (not just on a similar market). There are techniques that privilege CTR tests over CPI tests but it’s best to test directly on CPI even if it’s with a prototype.

28:02
💎 #
14

Direct ports of a game between geos never, ever work. You have to be prepared to have flexible UI across your game if you want it to work across different geos.

34:12
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💎 #
1

For hypercasual games, it all starts with a mindset of “we don’t know what we don’t know”. The best way of knowing is to get to market fast and test a lot of ideas. They have small, lean teams with ownership at the team level.

02:31
💎 #
2

For any games they do at Voodoo, they start by assessing the marketability first. They need to know very quickly that the game is viable on that front and that’s why they test a lot.

03:53
💎 #
3

Hypercasual is also about developing what the market demands at a big scale which means it is very based on trends: what was popular a few years ago may not be popular today. That’s why you have to test a lot.

04:19
💎 #
4

For a game like Call of Duty Mobile it is not just about having the right LTV/CPI ratio, it’s also about having the content pipeline that allows the game to maintain at a high level for a long time and evolve. Example: some content related to the “seasons” fatigued faster than they thought it would, so they had to tweak it.

06:27
💎 #
5

While Call of Duty mobile is primarily IAP, they are trying to build a massive community and they know that a lot of people are not going to pay. So there has to be a way for players to get cool gear without paying: players can grind their way through playing or through watching ads.

12:44
💎 #
6

However they do think about potential cannibalization of IAPs through ads/gameplay, so there are some cosmetics that you can only get through monetization. Example: a new common weapon (and its power) can be obtained through playing or watching ads (to keep things fair), but the best cosmetics often require paying.

13:32
💎 #
7

There is a trend in the “midcore casual”: “casual” games that become more and more complex. Example: Project Makeover which is like 3 games in one and covering different player needs in one game (decoration, fashion, match 3).

15:17
💎 #
8

There is also a trend of “hybrid casual” games that fall between casual and hypercasual (ad-based yet with a good amount of IAPs). These games offer more interest over time than hypercasual games, yet look very approachable (easy to get started on). Trend is also visible in China with games developed by Ohayoo.

16:04
💎 #
9

With ATT it’s important to think about games that have a broader appeal, where you don’t suffer from the lack of granularity.

17:02
💎 #
10

Post-ATT, the most important is how good you are at product marketing (not UA). UA is important (data science, creative capabilities) but there are ways you can drive installs and maintain community outside of UA. However the challenge for indies is that this tends to be very resource-intensive and it’s hard to achieve without increasing headcount.

19:16
💎 #
11

With ATT rolling out, there is an appetite for gaming developers to diversify their ads revenue and capture brand budget. In 2020, brand advertisers also understood that their audience is in gaming. We’re at the beginning of more brands advertising within games.

22:14
💎 #
12

To make it as a smaller studio, it’s less about the game idea that you have than it is about finding the right talent and building the right culture.

24:10
💎 #
13

When testing for marketability (hypercasual and casual games), test first on your actual target market (not just on a similar market). There are techniques that privilege CTR tests over CPI tests but it’s best to test directly on CPI even if it’s with a prototype.

28:02
💎 #
14

Direct ports of a game between geos never, ever work. You have to be prepared to have flexible UI across your game if you want it to work across different geos.

34:12
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💎 #
1

For hypercasual games, it all starts with a mindset of “we don’t know what we don’t know”. The best way of knowing is to get to market fast and test a lot of ideas. They have small, lean teams with ownership at the team level.

02:31
💎 #
2

For any games they do at Voodoo, they start by assessing the marketability first. They need to know very quickly that the game is viable on that front and that’s why they test a lot.

03:53
💎 #
3

Hypercasual is also about developing what the market demands at a big scale which means it is very based on trends: what was popular a few years ago may not be popular today. That’s why you have to test a lot.

04:19
💎 #
4

For a game like Call of Duty Mobile it is not just about having the right LTV/CPI ratio, it’s also about having the content pipeline that allows the game to maintain at a high level for a long time and evolve. Example: some content related to the “seasons” fatigued faster than they thought it would, so they had to tweak it.

06:27
💎 #
5

While Call of Duty mobile is primarily IAP, they are trying to build a massive community and they know that a lot of people are not going to pay. So there has to be a way for players to get cool gear without paying: players can grind their way through playing or through watching ads.

12:44
💎 #
6

However they do think about potential cannibalization of IAPs through ads/gameplay, so there are some cosmetics that you can only get through monetization. Example: a new common weapon (and its power) can be obtained through playing or watching ads (to keep things fair), but the best cosmetics often require paying.

13:32
💎 #
7

There is a trend in the “midcore casual”: “casual” games that become more and more complex. Example: Project Makeover which is like 3 games in one and covering different player needs in one game (decoration, fashion, match 3).

15:17
💎 #
8

There is also a trend of “hybrid casual” games that fall between casual and hypercasual (ad-based yet with a good amount of IAPs). These games offer more interest over time than hypercasual games, yet look very approachable (easy to get started on). Trend is also visible in China with games developed by Ohayoo.

16:04
💎 #
9

With ATT it’s important to think about games that have a broader appeal, where you don’t suffer from the lack of granularity.

17:02
💎 #
10

Post-ATT, the most important is how good you are at product marketing (not UA). UA is important (data science, creative capabilities) but there are ways you can drive installs and maintain community outside of UA. However the challenge for indies is that this tends to be very resource-intensive and it’s hard to achieve without increasing headcount.

19:16
💎 #
11

With ATT rolling out, there is an appetite for gaming developers to diversify their ads revenue and capture brand budget. In 2020, brand advertisers also understood that their audience is in gaming. We’re at the beginning of more brands advertising within games.

22:14
💎 #
12

To make it as a smaller studio, it’s less about the game idea that you have than it is about finding the right talent and building the right culture.

24:10
💎 #
13

When testing for marketability (hypercasual and casual games), test first on your actual target market (not just on a similar market). There are techniques that privilege CTR tests over CPI tests but it’s best to test directly on CPI even if it’s with a prototype.

28:02
💎 #
14

Direct ports of a game between geos never, ever work. You have to be prepared to have flexible UI across your game if you want it to work across different geos.

34:12
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Notes for this resource are currently being transferred and will be available soon.

How does your studio develop, launch and grow games?

Sophie

[💎@02:31] For hypercasual games, it all starts with a mindset of “we don’t know what we don’t know”. The best way of knowing is to get to market fast and test a lot of ideas. They have small, lean teams with ownership at the team level.

“we don’t know what we don’t know”

For hypercasual they test games in 1 week, casual in 1 month, etc.

[💎@03:53] For any games they do at Voodoo, they start by assessing the marketability first. They need to know very quickly that the game is viable on that front and that’s why they test a lot.

[💎@04:19] Hypercasual is also about developing what the market demands at a big scale which means it is very based on trends: what was popular a few years ago may not be popular today. That’s why you have to test a lot.

Matthew

Very different approach.

What’s important for Call of Duty is to have an evergreen game that will last for years, with a huge active community. So there is a lot of work involved in getting the concept right and making sure that there is a good fit with the IP.

1. Start with vision of what the game should be and break down milestones to get there

2. First soft launch with enough content for players to have a close-to-launch experience

3. Validate KPIs that they think they need to have to be successful at scale

[💎@06:27] For a game like Call of Duty Mobile it is not just about having the right LTV/CPI ratio, it’s also about having the content pipeline that allows the game to maintain at a high level for a long time and evolve. Example: some content related to the “seasons” fatigued faster than they thought it would, so they had to tweak it.

Creatives do help inform what to build.

Vincent

Vincent likes to see MoPub as the extension of the monetization team at Voodoo. They try to surface some unique insights and blind spots they might have, through peer analysis for example.

MoPub is more relevant for ad-first games like Voodoo.

Role of in-app ads in decision making?

Matthew

From a player’s perspective, what’s important is that you can get cool gear which you actually use in the game. And it’s important to make that possible without paying.

[💎@12:44] While Call of Duty mobile is primarily IAP, they are trying to build a massive community and they know that a lot of people are not going to pay. So there has to be a way for players to get cool gear without paying: players can grind their way through playing or through watching ads.

[💎@13:32] However they do think about potential cannibalization of IAPs through ads/gameplay, so there are some cosmetics that you can only get through monetization. Example: a new common weapon (and its power) can be obtained through playing or watching ads (to keep things fair), but the best cosmetics often require paying.

Where is the market heading in 2021 and beyond?

Sophie

[💎@15:17] There is a trend in the “midcore casual”: “casual” games that become more and more complex. Example: Project Makeover which is like 3 games in one and covering different player needs in one game (decoration, fashion, match 3).

[💎@16:04] There is also a trend of “hybrid casual” games that fall between casual and hypercasual (ad-based yet with a good amount of IAPs). These games offer more interest over time than hypercasual games, yet look very approachable (easy to get started on). Trend is also visible in China with games developed by Ohayoo.

[💎@17:02] With ATT it’s important to think about games that have a broader appeal, where you don’t suffer from the lack of granularity. 

Games that know their audience very well and can convince them to opt-in will see their ad revenue increase.

Matthew

Used to think that game mechanics would translate well from one game to the other. Now it feels like everything is evolving differently depending on the genre.

[💎@19:16] Post-ATT, the most important is how good you are at product marketing (not UA). UA is important (data science, creative capabilities) but there are ways you can drive installs and maintain community outside of UA. However the challenge for indies is that this tends to be very resource-intensive and it’s hard to achieve without increasing headcount.

Vincent

In terms of ad monetization, once a publisher reaches maturity in their vertical they start to diversify: IAP-focused games diversifying with ads, Ad-based games diversifying with IAP.

[💎@22:14] With ATT rolling out, there is an appetite for gaming developers to diversify their ads revenue and capture brand budget. In 2020, brand advertisers also understood that their audience is in gaming. We’re at the beginning of more brands advertising within games.

Advice for smaller studios?

Vincent

[💎@24:10] To make it as a smaller studio, it’s less about the game idea that you have than it is about finding the right talent and building the right culture.

“Don’t try to take on the giants”

Define a thesis that does not include taking on teams that have hundreds of people.

Sophie

Find niche games that only your studio can make given your size. Even though with ATT there will be challenges with niche audiences.

How to determine that a game has good marketability?

Sophie
[💎@28:02] When testing for marketability (hypercasual and casual games), test first on your actual target market (not just on a similar market). There are techniques that privilege CTR tests over CPI tests but it’s best to test directly on CPI even if it’s with a prototype.

What matters is the ballpark at which you start, e.g. $8 CPI vs. < $1 CPI.

Testing new features, game mechanics, etc. through creatives?

Matthew

You might be able to understand top of funnel demand through creatives, and you should do it if you are a smaller studio. For Call of Duty however, they have no problem attracting installs so it’s more about retaining users.

Use some focus groups pre-launch, but for seasons it’s more of a creative exercise. 

What can we learn from the Asian market (including leveraging IPs)?

Sophie

There is much more predictability in Asia around success when leveraging big franchises and IPs. But in the west a big IP is not a guarantee that things are going to work out.


Matthew

There are big differences between Asian countries themselves (in games, in publishing strategies).

That said, the publishing playbook in Asia is very different: in the US we are too reliant on UA. You need to think about what you can do differently to scale your game in different geos.

“Direct ports never work”

[💎@34:12] Direct ports of a game between geos never, ever work. You have to be prepared to have flexible UI across your game if you want it to work across different geos.


The notes from this resource are only available to premium members.
↘ At this point, you know what to do ↙
Upgrade Your Plan

How does your studio develop, launch and grow games?

Sophie

[💎@02:31] For hypercasual games, it all starts with a mindset of “we don’t know what we don’t know”. The best way of knowing is to get to market fast and test a lot of ideas. They have small, lean teams with ownership at the team level.

“we don’t know what we don’t know”

For hypercasual they test games in 1 week, casual in 1 month, etc.

[💎@03:53] For any games they do at Voodoo, they start by assessing the marketability first. They need to know very quickly that the game is viable on that front and that’s why they test a lot.

[💎@04:19] Hypercasual is also about developing what the market demands at a big scale which means it is very based on trends: what was popular a few years ago may not be popular today. That’s why you have to test a lot.

Matthew

Very different approach.

What’s important for Call of Duty is to have an evergreen game that will last for years, with a huge active community. So there is a lot of work involved in getting the concept right and making sure that there is a good fit with the IP.

1. Start with vision of what the game should be and break down milestones to get there

2. First soft launch with enough content for players to have a close-to-launch experience

3. Validate KPIs that they think they need to have to be successful at scale

[💎@06:27] For a game like Call of Duty Mobile it is not just about having the right LTV/CPI ratio, it’s also about having the content pipeline that allows the game to maintain at a high level for a long time and evolve. Example: some content related to the “seasons” fatigued faster than they thought it would, so they had to tweak it.

Creatives do help inform what to build.

Vincent

Vincent likes to see MoPub as the extension of the monetization team at Voodoo. They try to surface some unique insights and blind spots they might have, through peer analysis for example.

MoPub is more relevant for ad-first games like Voodoo.

Role of in-app ads in decision making?

Matthew

From a player’s perspective, what’s important is that you can get cool gear which you actually use in the game. And it’s important to make that possible without paying.

[💎@12:44] While Call of Duty mobile is primarily IAP, they are trying to build a massive community and they know that a lot of people are not going to pay. So there has to be a way for players to get cool gear without paying: players can grind their way through playing or through watching ads.

[💎@13:32] However they do think about potential cannibalization of IAPs through ads/gameplay, so there are some cosmetics that you can only get through monetization. Example: a new common weapon (and its power) can be obtained through playing or watching ads (to keep things fair), but the best cosmetics often require paying.

Where is the market heading in 2021 and beyond?

Sophie

[💎@15:17] There is a trend in the “midcore casual”: “casual” games that become more and more complex. Example: Project Makeover which is like 3 games in one and covering different player needs in one game (decoration, fashion, match 3).

[💎@16:04] There is also a trend of “hybrid casual” games that fall between casual and hypercasual (ad-based yet with a good amount of IAPs). These games offer more interest over time than hypercasual games, yet look very approachable (easy to get started on). Trend is also visible in China with games developed by Ohayoo.

[💎@17:02] With ATT it’s important to think about games that have a broader appeal, where you don’t suffer from the lack of granularity. 

Games that know their audience very well and can convince them to opt-in will see their ad revenue increase.

Matthew

Used to think that game mechanics would translate well from one game to the other. Now it feels like everything is evolving differently depending on the genre.

[💎@19:16] Post-ATT, the most important is how good you are at product marketing (not UA). UA is important (data science, creative capabilities) but there are ways you can drive installs and maintain community outside of UA. However the challenge for indies is that this tends to be very resource-intensive and it’s hard to achieve without increasing headcount.

Vincent

In terms of ad monetization, once a publisher reaches maturity in their vertical they start to diversify: IAP-focused games diversifying with ads, Ad-based games diversifying with IAP.

[💎@22:14] With ATT rolling out, there is an appetite for gaming developers to diversify their ads revenue and capture brand budget. In 2020, brand advertisers also understood that their audience is in gaming. We’re at the beginning of more brands advertising within games.

Advice for smaller studios?

Vincent

[💎@24:10] To make it as a smaller studio, it’s less about the game idea that you have than it is about finding the right talent and building the right culture.

“Don’t try to take on the giants”

Define a thesis that does not include taking on teams that have hundreds of people.

Sophie

Find niche games that only your studio can make given your size. Even though with ATT there will be challenges with niche audiences.

How to determine that a game has good marketability?

Sophie
[💎@28:02] When testing for marketability (hypercasual and casual games), test first on your actual target market (not just on a similar market). There are techniques that privilege CTR tests over CPI tests but it’s best to test directly on CPI even if it’s with a prototype.

What matters is the ballpark at which you start, e.g. $8 CPI vs. < $1 CPI.

Testing new features, game mechanics, etc. through creatives?

Matthew

You might be able to understand top of funnel demand through creatives, and you should do it if you are a smaller studio. For Call of Duty however, they have no problem attracting installs so it’s more about retaining users.

Use some focus groups pre-launch, but for seasons it’s more of a creative exercise. 

What can we learn from the Asian market (including leveraging IPs)?

Sophie

There is much more predictability in Asia around success when leveraging big franchises and IPs. But in the west a big IP is not a guarantee that things are going to work out.


Matthew

There are big differences between Asian countries themselves (in games, in publishing strategies).

That said, the publishing playbook in Asia is very different: in the US we are too reliant on UA. You need to think about what you can do differently to scale your game in different geos.

“Direct ports never work”

[💎@34:12] Direct ports of a game between geos never, ever work. You have to be prepared to have flexible UI across your game if you want it to work across different geos.


The notes from this resource are only available to premium members.

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How does your studio develop, launch and grow games?

Sophie

[💎@02:31] For hypercasual games, it all starts with a mindset of “we don’t know what we don’t know”. The best way of knowing is to get to market fast and test a lot of ideas. They have small, lean teams with ownership at the team level.

“we don’t know what we don’t know”

For hypercasual they test games in 1 week, casual in 1 month, etc.

[💎@03:53] For any games they do at Voodoo, they start by assessing the marketability first. They need to know very quickly that the game is viable on that front and that’s why they test a lot.

[💎@04:19] Hypercasual is also about developing what the market demands at a big scale which means it is very based on trends: what was popular a few years ago may not be popular today. That’s why you have to test a lot.

Matthew

Very different approach.

What’s important for Call of Duty is to have an evergreen game that will last for years, with a huge active community. So there is a lot of work involved in getting the concept right and making sure that there is a good fit with the IP.

1. Start with vision of what the game should be and break down milestones to get there

2. First soft launch with enough content for players to have a close-to-launch experience

3. Validate KPIs that they think they need to have to be successful at scale

[💎@06:27] For a game like Call of Duty Mobile it is not just about having the right LTV/CPI ratio, it’s also about having the content pipeline that allows the game to maintain at a high level for a long time and evolve. Example: some content related to the “seasons” fatigued faster than they thought it would, so they had to tweak it.

Creatives do help inform what to build.

Vincent

Vincent likes to see MoPub as the extension of the monetization team at Voodoo. They try to surface some unique insights and blind spots they might have, through peer analysis for example.

MoPub is more relevant for ad-first games like Voodoo.

Role of in-app ads in decision making?

Matthew

From a player’s perspective, what’s important is that you can get cool gear which you actually use in the game. And it’s important to make that possible without paying.

[💎@12:44] While Call of Duty mobile is primarily IAP, they are trying to build a massive community and they know that a lot of people are not going to pay. So there has to be a way for players to get cool gear without paying: players can grind their way through playing or through watching ads.

[💎@13:32] However they do think about potential cannibalization of IAPs through ads/gameplay, so there are some cosmetics that you can only get through monetization. Example: a new common weapon (and its power) can be obtained through playing or watching ads (to keep things fair), but the best cosmetics often require paying.

Where is the market heading in 2021 and beyond?

Sophie

[💎@15:17] There is a trend in the “midcore casual”: “casual” games that become more and more complex. Example: Project Makeover which is like 3 games in one and covering different player needs in one game (decoration, fashion, match 3).

[💎@16:04] There is also a trend of “hybrid casual” games that fall between casual and hypercasual (ad-based yet with a good amount of IAPs). These games offer more interest over time than hypercasual games, yet look very approachable (easy to get started on). Trend is also visible in China with games developed by Ohayoo.

[💎@17:02] With ATT it’s important to think about games that have a broader appeal, where you don’t suffer from the lack of granularity. 

Games that know their audience very well and can convince them to opt-in will see their ad revenue increase.

Matthew

Used to think that game mechanics would translate well from one game to the other. Now it feels like everything is evolving differently depending on the genre.

[💎@19:16] Post-ATT, the most important is how good you are at product marketing (not UA). UA is important (data science, creative capabilities) but there are ways you can drive installs and maintain community outside of UA. However the challenge for indies is that this tends to be very resource-intensive and it’s hard to achieve without increasing headcount.

Vincent

In terms of ad monetization, once a publisher reaches maturity in their vertical they start to diversify: IAP-focused games diversifying with ads, Ad-based games diversifying with IAP.

[💎@22:14] With ATT rolling out, there is an appetite for gaming developers to diversify their ads revenue and capture brand budget. In 2020, brand advertisers also understood that their audience is in gaming. We’re at the beginning of more brands advertising within games.

Advice for smaller studios?

Vincent

[💎@24:10] To make it as a smaller studio, it’s less about the game idea that you have than it is about finding the right talent and building the right culture.

“Don’t try to take on the giants”

Define a thesis that does not include taking on teams that have hundreds of people.

Sophie

Find niche games that only your studio can make given your size. Even though with ATT there will be challenges with niche audiences.

How to determine that a game has good marketability?

Sophie
[💎@28:02] When testing for marketability (hypercasual and casual games), test first on your actual target market (not just on a similar market). There are techniques that privilege CTR tests over CPI tests but it’s best to test directly on CPI even if it’s with a prototype.

What matters is the ballpark at which you start, e.g. $8 CPI vs. < $1 CPI.

Testing new features, game mechanics, etc. through creatives?

Matthew

You might be able to understand top of funnel demand through creatives, and you should do it if you are a smaller studio. For Call of Duty however, they have no problem attracting installs so it’s more about retaining users.

Use some focus groups pre-launch, but for seasons it’s more of a creative exercise. 

What can we learn from the Asian market (including leveraging IPs)?

Sophie

There is much more predictability in Asia around success when leveraging big franchises and IPs. But in the west a big IP is not a guarantee that things are going to work out.


Matthew

There are big differences between Asian countries themselves (in games, in publishing strategies).

That said, the publishing playbook in Asia is very different: in the US we are too reliant on UA. You need to think about what you can do differently to scale your game in different geos.

“Direct ports never work”

[💎@34:12] Direct ports of a game between geos never, ever work. You have to be prepared to have flexible UI across your game if you want it to work across different geos.